Exercise Library

Jerk Dip



The jerk dip is a partial jerk exercise to strengthen the dip position—in particular the ability to arrest the downward movement of the weight in order to drive back up.
 
 
Execution
 
Place the bar in the jerk rack position with your feet in the same stance you use to jerk. Bend at the knees only just as you would for the jerk, but very abruptly and rapidly—the goal is to get the bar to whip as hard as possible at the bottom of the dip, and bring it to a stop as abruptly as possible. The faster the bar is moving downward and the faster it's brought to a stop, the more effective the exercise is.

Even though it’s a very quick dip, it’s important to keep the bar connected to the shoulders rather than dropping out from under it. It’s also critical that the position and balance be correct. Typically this exercise is done only for a single rep following cleans or front squats, but if done for multiple reps, recover from the bottom of each dip at a natural pace—there is no explosive upward drive component.
 
 
Notes
 
The speed at which you dip in this exercise may exceed the speed at which you dip during an actual jerk depending on your jerk style. This is intentional in order to create more downward force for the legs to absorb and arrest.
 
 
Purpose
 
The jerk dip is intended to strengthen the bottom of the dip and train the legs to absorb the downward force in order to better transition and drive from the bottom of the dip in the jerk. More specifically, it improves the "braking" ability for the dip to allow the lifter to maximize the use of the bar whip and potentiated knee extension force in the drive. 
 
 
Programming
 
The jerk dip can be performed in isolation from a rack for 1-5 reps, but most commonly it’s performed for a single rep at the end of a set of cleans or front squats as a some bonus work for the jerk. Weights can be very heavy and exceed the lifter’s maximum jerk as long as the position and balance are correct.
 
 
Variations
 
There are a few variations of the jerk dip that are considered distinct exercises (see below).
 
 
See Also
 





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